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C-Suite Often Isn’t on the Hook for Inclusivity

 


The Wall Street Journal | March 19, 2019


The Wall Street Journal newsletter, “C-Suite Often Isn’t on the Hook for Inclusivity," featured the Russell Reynolds Associates paper, "Inclusive Leadership: Unlocking the Value of Diversity and Inclusion," and quoted Russell Reynolds Associates Consultant Anthony Abbatiello on why most C-suite executives aren't held accountable for creating an inclusive workplace. The article is excerpted below.

Corporate culture is becoming an important point for investors and consumers. Most C-suite executives, though, aren’t held accountable for creating an inclusive workplace.

That is according to the recruiting and advisory firm Russell Reynolds Associates. The firm recently surveyed 1,800 executives across industries on the topic of diversity. Only 40% of respondents—mostly senior vice presidents, vice presidents and other managers—said leaders at their companies were held accountable for creating an inclusive culture.

Anthony Abbatiello, head of the leadership and succession division at Russell Reynolds, said companies should consider coaching senior leaders on inclusion and tracking their progress. And on a more basic level, he said, companies should ask a simple question about their senior leaders: “Are they putting us at risk?”

To read the full article, click here.



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C-Suite Often Isn’t on the Hook for Inclusivity