Technology and the CEO Résumé: Why it Matters
Technology and InnovationTransformation InnovationLeadershipTechnologyBoard and CEO AdvisoryTechnology, Data, and DigitalDevelopment and Transition
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August 23, 2017
Technology and InnovationTransformation InnovationLeadershipTechnologyBoard and CEO AdvisoryTechnology, Data, and DigitalDevelopment and Transition
The Chief Executive article, “Technology and the CEO Résumé: Why it Matters,” quoted Russell Reynolds Associates Consultant Margot McShane in its three-part series on the importance of technology to CEOs in today’s business landscape to make sure it’s being factored in to their decisions and their company’s strategic direction. The article is excerpted below.
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Chief Executive

Technology is key to increasing operational efficiency, building agility, becoming more customer-centric and driving innovation. It is fundamental to the creation of new products and services. And it is reshaping the competitive landscape, lowering the cost of entry for smaller companies and enabling competitors to quickly cross traditional industry boundaries. 
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“People who grow up in technology are expecting someone else to come out with something more competitive and better the next day,” says Margot McShane, executive director at the San Francisco office of the Russell Reynolds Associates executive search firm. “They are constantly assuming that what’s worked in the past will not work in the future. It’s an agile environment of ‘try, optimize, learn, evolve.’” 
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Sharing insights with executives at other firms also can help. “Spend time with peers in the market—not direct competitors, but companies that might be at a similar life stage and grappling with similar questions about technology,” says Margot McShane, executive director at the San Francisco office of executive search firm Russell Reynolds Associates. “Having good peer support is important.” 

Spending time with companies that are driving disruption also can help. McShane says that some CEOs visit Silicon Valley firms, where “they are not just going in for a dog-and-pony show for an hour. They are sitting with the culture, they are sitting with the employees.” They learn “how we are doing business. This is how we make decisions. This is the language we use.” 

To read the full article, click here.